DNA Tag

Can we rely on the DNA match statistic from specialist statistical software?

DNA match statistic terms forming an image of a diceAs DNA profiling methods have become ever more sensitive, the detection of trace amounts of DNA has significantly improved. As a result, the number of DNA mixtures we encounter has increased.  This was especially highlighted following the introduction of DNA17 methods in 2014. In many situations the mixtures have multiple contributors and are complex to interpret.  Whilst previously many results were designated as too complex for interpretation, the last few years have seen the introduction of ‘probabilistic genotyping software’ packages which enable a statistical evaluation of complex results.

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DNA transfer: A question of how and when

Mr Red and Mr Yellow shake hands and transfer their DNA to the other personIn recent years, forensic science has seen a number of significant improvements in the field of forensic DNA analysis.  One of the drivers has been the need to detect ever decreasing amounts of DNA.  The DNA17 technique, in routine use in the UK since July 2014, is much more sensitive than its predecessor SGMPlus, and therefore the spotlight is shining brightly on the issues around DNA transfer and persistence.

What does the presence of an individual’s DNA on an item related to a crime actually mean in the context of the case circumstances?  The presence of a DNA match to a suspect’s profile tells you nothing about how or when the DNA got there.  Scenarios incorporating multiple DNA transfer steps, rather than a single direct transfer, are increasingly being raised in court as potential means for the presence of the defendant’s DNA at the crime scene or on an evidential item.

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Use it or Lose it: Is expertise in some body fluid examinations being lost?

Forensic body fluid analysis includes tests for urine stains As body fluid examinations have become heavily focused on the ability to obtain a DNA profile, the expertise in analysis and interpretation of tests for some of the more rarely encountered body fluids, including urine and faeces, has become limited.  Some of the main forensic providers no longer offer this testing under their UKAS Accreditation.  In a case, reviewed by Forensic Context, in which there was an allegation of the offender urinating onto the clothing of the complainant, the lack of any testing for urine was questioned by the defence and clarity sought as to whether testing was possible or simply not offered by the prosecution provider.

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DNA transfer through non-intimate contact

Male and Female symbols

In sexual offence cases where no semen is detected, the presence of female DNA on penile swabs and underwear of the defendant may be put forward to address the issue of whether or not sexual intercourse took place.  However it is known that DNA can be transferred through non-intimate contact so research was commissioned to investigate the frequency and amount of DNA which might be transferred in this way.  The work was recently published in Science and Justice by the UK and Ireland Association of Forensic Science Providers’ Body Fluid Forum which our expert Julie Allard co-chaired at the time of the research.
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Streamlined Forensic Reporting – the hidden truth

Forensic EvidenceStreamlined Forensic Reporting (SFR) was rolled out nationally in April 2013.  The CPS guidance document states that  “SFR is a revised case management procedure for producing forensic evidence at court, which seeks to reduce unnecessary costs, and delay in the criminal justice system. The process takes a more proportionate approach to forensic evidence through the early preparation of a short report that details the key forensic evidence the prosecution intend to rely upon.  The aim is to achieve early agreement with the defence on forensic issues but where this cannot be achieved in the first instance, to identify the contested issues.”

The first stage SFR1 report is not a witness statement or report to which the Criminal Procedure Rules apply.  It is, at this stage, difficult for the defence to determine whether they dispute the evidence being provided as the information that the SFR1 provides is often nothing more than a bland description of the analytical result, with little if any background or interpretational information.  READ MORE